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New law journal launches that focuses on open source

There’s a new law journal in town: “The International Free and Open Source Software Law Review (IFOSS L. Rev.) is a collaborative legal publication aiming to increase knowledge and understanding among lawyers about Free and Open Source Software issues. Topics covered include copyright, licence implementation, licence interpretation, software patents, open standards, case law and statutory changes.”

By Kristopher A. Nelson in

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There’s a new law journal in town:

The  (IFOSS L. Rev.) is a collaborative legal publication aiming to increase knowledge and understanding among lawyers about Free and Open Source Software issues. Topics covered include copyright, licence implementation, licence interpretation, software patents, open standards, case law and statutory changes.

via the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review.

Cearta.ie adds some more details:

It is a peer reviewed biannual journal for high-level analysis and debate about Free and Open Source Software legal issues, and it will receive financial and administrative support from the NLNet Foundation, which supports organizations and people that contribute to an open information society. Edited by Andrew Katz and Amanda Brock, its focus includes copyright, licence implementation, licence interpretation, software patents, open standards, case law and statutory changes. Unsurprisingly, it operates a strong Open Access Policy, providing immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

via cearta.ie » New Open Source Law Journal.

So what’s in the first edition? Here’s the (very interesting) table of contents:

Foreword and statement of purpose: an introduction to IFOSS L. Rev., Iain G Mitchell QC

Articles

  • The Fiduciary Licence Agreement: Appointing legal guardians for Free Software Projects, Ywein Van den Brande
  • Collaborative Approach: Peer-to-Patent and the Open Source Movement, Christopher Wong, Jason Kreps
  • Bad Facts Make Good Law: The Jacobsen Case and Open Source, Lawrence Rosen
  • Introducing The Risk Grid, Shane Martin Coughlan, Andrew Katz

Case Law Reports

  • Jacobsen v Katzer and Kamind Associates – an English legal perspective, Mark Henley

Book reviews

  • ‘Open Source Technology and Policy’ by Fadi P. Deek and James A.M. McHugh, Andrew Katz

Tech Watch

  • Tech Watch, Adriaan de Groot

Platform

  • Collaboration Among Counsel Celebrating the Formation of a Community of Lawyers for the Advancement of Understanding of Free and Open Source Licensing and Business Models, Karen Faulds Copenhaver

This looks like a journal to watch going forward.

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